BRIC-19
  • Social Distance, Digital Congregation:

    British Ritual Innovation under COVID-19

  • Social Distance, Digital Congregation:

    British Ritual Innovation under COVID-19

  • Social Distance, Digital Congregation:

    British Ritual Innovation under COVID-19

  • Social Distance, Digital Congregation:

    British Ritual Innovation under COVID-19

  • Social Distance, Digital Congregation:

    British Ritual Innovation under COVID-19

  • Social Distance, Digital Congregation:

    British Ritual Innovation under COVID-19

Project Team

Dr Charles Roding Pemberton

Research Assistant

Dr Charles Roding Pemberton is a writer and lecturer based in the north east of England. He has taught theology and political philosophy at the Universities of Chester, Manchester and Durham and written for a range of blogs, magazines and academic journals. Following a PhD funded by the Lincoln Theological Institute at the University of Manchester, he returned to Durham as the holder of the Horsfall and William Leech research fellowships and carried out a two year ethnographic project on the north east’s emergency food aid network. This research was published earlier this year in the book Bread of Life in Broken Britain: Food banks, faith and neoliberalism, a text which draws attention to the neglected overlap of labour marginality, food insecurity and construction of religious identity through volunteerism in the contemporary UK.

Along with his work with Social Distance, Digital Congregations and his teaching at the University of Durham, Roding Pemberton is preparing a monograph based on his PhD research on the British homelessness sector. This monograph will examine how the metaphor of ‘home’ structures political and theological discursive articulations in ways that impact on the operations of homelessness charities and lives of homeless people; in particular, it will explore the effects of ethno-nationalist populism on the British political culture and ask whether it is possible to be at home in language without recourse to essentialists modes of argument.

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